BATHSHEBA Bathed in Grace: How 8 Scandalous Women Changed the World - Carol Cook

Adultery, lies, deception, scandal, murder, cover-up, heartache, pain, and loss—stories with these sordid elements are relevant today. And women with shady pasts—labeled, shamed, and linked with tragedies—are part of our heritage. Bathsheba, a victim or temptress, Eve outside of Eden, Tamar posed as a prostitute, Leah stole her sister Rachel’s fiancé…Sarah gave Hagar to her husband and Rebekah masterminded a grave deception. How well do you really know the women of the Bible?

From BookLookBloggers.com

 

 

 

 

 

*I was provided with an e-copy of this book for review from BookLookBloggers.com & Harper Collins Christian Publishing

 

 

Carol Cook takes the stories of eight famous women of the Bible -- Bathsheba, Sarah, Hagar, Rebekah, Leah, Rachal, Tamar and the big momma herself, Eve -- and brings their stories to life, recreating the scenes of their stories as easily imaginable environments and situations, rich in detail. It is this attention to the details that allows for the reader to find the tales of these women even more relatable than ever before. 

 

Reading the story of Bathsheba, the wife of the soldier Uriah and object of desire for King David, I could feel her longing for her husband away on the battlefield, hear her cries of pain later on at learning King David's deception to win her for himself, and later when she has to bear the loss of a child. 

 

I loved the story of Sarah & Abram, admiring her strength and ability to forgive her husband though he put her in some painfully awkward and sometimes dangerous situations!

 

I think my favorite stories were those of Rebekah -- nearly brought me to tears, that one! -- and Eve.  I also liked how all the stories were laid out so that the reader could see the progression of the family trees in an easy-to-follow way, much more so than all the "begats" we typically have to carefully read in the Bible itself!  {For example, the reader gets the love triangle story of Leah / Rebekah / Jacob, then in a later story reads of Tamar, daughter-in-law to Judah, Judah being a son of Leah & Jacob}.

 

I really appreciated that Carol Cook could bring these women to life, make them feel more like real women with real everyday struggles that women of modern times could easily identify with. Not only that, but the stories exemplify how such struggles can be the ultimate learning experiences, lessons in strength, and opportunities for emotional & spiritual growth. And let's not forget -- the chance to learn how to walk in grace and empathy!